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The Staffordshire Hoard

Anglo-Saxon gold stash!

Pectoral Cross, Staffordshire Hoard

Discovered in a field near Lichfield by Terry Herbert, using a metal-detector, the Staffordshire Hoard is the largest collection of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver ever discovered. There are more than 600 objects found in fragments adding up to 4 kilos of gold, 1.7 kilos of silver and thousands of cloisonné garnets.

Said to be war booty, the collection includes sword hilt decorations, helmet pieces and the star items listed include the Millefiori Stud, Zoomorphic Mount and Pectoral Cross. The items have been dated to between the mid-sixth and mid-seventh centuries AD and their burial between 650-675 AD.

The Staffordshire Hoard is owned by Birmingham and Stoke-on-Trent City Councils on behalf of the nation and is cared for by Birmingham Museums Trust and The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery.

The Staffordshire Hoard is on display at Potteries Museum & Art Gallery, Stoke-on-Trent and usat the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery (BMAG).

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Potteries Museum & Art Gallery, Bethesda St, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent ST1 3DW (this entry’s map location)

Staffordshire Hoard

Birmingham

Ancient, Roman, Saxon

Staffordshire

Text © Alison Plummer

Image by Birmingham Museums/BMAG.